Success Insights

We are in the month of December 2012…I cannot believe it. More importantly, I cannot believe that it’s December and close to 70 degrees in DC, of course I am not complaining, but just saying:)

I was thinking the other day that sometimes we don’t appreciate what we have…sure things could be better, but they could be worse, so how can we really tell if the grass is greener on the other side.

Despite any frustrations you are facing on your job today, is leaving the only and best option for you? Are your peers really happier at their companies? Are you truly missing out on your long-term career goals if you stay where you are?

An article in the August issue of Talent Management magazine gave some pretty good insight on why some employees are not happy in the work and what factors impact their poor performance and eventually prompt them to leave. After reading the article, I thought it also provided great food for thought on what executives should consider before jumping ship.

Career satisfaction indicator#1: While everyone is not destined for a management or a leadership role, do you feel like your company has placed you in the right role according to your strengths, skills, interests and competencies? Don’t wait until annual reviews to address your concerns; pay close attention to your organization’s goals and determine how your skills and aspirations fit in the overall picture.

Career satisfaction indicator #2: Can you have open, honest discussion with your manager about your career goals and aspirations? You may not know where all the growth opportunities exist in your company, but a company committed to your growth will encourage and ever recommend you to new projects, initiatives and promotional/lateral roles.

Career satisfaction indicator #3: Do you trust the leadership at your company? Do you feel included in key decisions and that your voice is heard? A lack of trust and true engagement in any company is the fastest way to get employees jumping ship; evaluate whether your company’s short-term and long-term goals are in line with yours.

Career satisfaction indicator #4: Do feel connected to the company’s mission and purpose? You will achieve better career success and satisfaction when can understand your role and value in the company. Re-evaluate whether factors that are important to you are reflected in your daily work.

Career satisfaction indicator #5: Does your company financially or otherwise support employee professional and personal development? Whether your growth comes from on the job training, mentoring opportunities or through formal classes, workshops and webinars, you want to part of company whose environment supports ongoing learning.

Career satisfaction indicator #6: Do you feel energized by your work environment? Can you identify at least three to five strong working relationships or partnerships you enjoy? You will always shine in an environment that encourages interpersonal relationships and formal/informal connections.

Career satisfaction indicator #7: Are you stifled by a “command-and-control” leadership style at your company? Are you consistently bumping into the iron fist of management? Studies have shown that employees are more motivated by autonomy to solve business challenges and opportunities to stretch beyond their comfort zone.

Career satisfaction indicator #8: Are you an overworked top performer? Have you become everyone’s “go-to” person? As much as you may love your job, watch out for career burnout signs..loving your job is one thing, but if you are starting to feel irritable, having emotional reactions or making too many mistakes and nobody cares…it may be time to re-evaluate your ties to the company.

Which of these indicators are a concern for you? Which of these are mendable and can be addressed with your manager?

 

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Abby Locke is an executive resume writer and career transformation coach who helps emerging leaders, executives and professional women to craft compelling career narratives and standout brand profiles.

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