Success Insights

self-employed-executivesI feel like I am emerging from a fog after a week and half of a bad cold that turned into a sinus infection…no fun at all. I enjoyed the first few days of rest and sitting still, but having to stay indoors when the weather is beautiful is not easy.

So today, I am happy to be feeling better, closer to feeling normal and one day closer to Friday…that’s always a good reason to celebrate:)

If you are scratching your head about my blog title, I promise it will make sense in a few minutes. The main message I am giving you today is the importance of taking control of your own career and being more proactive about decisions that impact your long-term career growth.

Essentially, you don’t want to be the employee in waiting who is simply accepting what is handed to him/her by a company or senior management. Consider this:

  • Are you aware of what skills, expertise or competencies you will need for the next 3 years?
  • Have you identified your top strengths and areas of improvement?
  • Do you understand your company’s mission and how you fit in the big picture?

When you are aware of what you have to offer, understand your environment and are willing to address your skill gaps, you are better positioned for valuable career options. So how does this happen? You start by wearing an entrepreneurial hat and having a self-employed mindset about your career.

Old attitude: I will buckle down, work hard and not worry about job loss or job security because I know they/the company needs me.

Self-employed attitude: I will accept change, be flexible and take greater responsibility for my work/life and professional development by continuously assessing my strengths and focusing on work priorities.

Old attitude: My boss or senior management understand what is needed and can best determine where my skills are the best fit – after all they know what’s best for everyone.

Self-employed attitude: During interviews and performance review discussions, I will present what I have to offer and promote my value, ask in-depth questions about the company needs and determine what roles and opportunities are the best fit for me.

Old attitude: My past successes, contributions and achievements speak volumes for themselves – I don’t need to keep trying too hard to impress anyone.

Self-employed attitude: I will commit to lifelong learning, gaining new perspective, learn from my mistakes and leverage my past successes to fuel innovation thinking and produce new contributions.

What limiting work attitude or beliefs can you let go of today? Are you an “employed” or a “self-employed” executive?

 

 

 

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Abby Locke is an executive resume writer and career transformation coach who helps emerging leaders, executives and professional women to craft compelling career narratives and standout brand profiles.

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